Cobia





Also known as: Black Kingfish, Black Salmon, Cabio, Crab-eater, Lemonfish, Ling, Runner, Sergeant Fish

Cobia are found worldwide in tropical and warm, temperate waters both offshore and inshore. Adult cobia seem to prefer shallow continental shelf waters. They particularly like buoys, pilings, wrecks, anchored boats, flotsam, etc., and will sometimes congregate around these objects.

It is the only known member of the family Rachycentridae. It has a long, broad, depressed head. The overall appearance of the fish is similar to that of a small shark, given the shape of the body, the powerful tail fin, and the elevated anterior portion of the second dorsal fin. Even more striking is its resemblance to the remora. The most noticeable difference between these two species is the suction pad on the remoras head. The cobia is known to swim with sharks and other large species as the remora does.

The cobia’s coloration and markings are distinctive. The back is dark chocolate brown while the sides are lighter with alternate horizontal stripes of brown and silver or bronze and white. The markings on smaller specimens are more vivid; the black and dark stripes are blacker, making the lighter areas stand out more.

The cobia is a highly rated, hard-hitting game fish that is prone to long, powerful, determined runs and occasional leaps. Often when one is hooked the entire school will surface along with it. Preferred fishing methods are trolling with lures or baits, bottom fishing, jigging, chumming, and spin casting. They can be caught on crustaceans (which is why they are nicknamed crab-eaters in Australia) as well as on smaller fishes. Good baits are squid, crabs, small live baits, cut baits, and strip baits. Spoons, plugs, and weighted feathers can also be used. They rate high as table fare.Type your paragraph here.

Fishing

Internationally renowned as one of the top sport fishing destinations, Florida’s second largest open water estuary is formed by the blending of saltwater from the Gulf of Mexico and freshwater from the Peace and Myakka River. World famous fishing can be found right here in our Charlotte Harbor and you will be sure to catch such fish as sea trout, redfish, snook, shark, cobia, grouper or tarpon. Be sure to take pictures… we would love to post on our website what you catch!!!!



Fishing Poles: 
Need a fishing pole? Goodtimes has fishing poles available for $10 each a day. Also, please give us a call and we will give you a recommendation on where to obtain a fishing license.


Bait:
Be sure to stop in at the Port O Call …right next door and they will be sure to hook you up with all the live bait you will need for a perfect day of fishing.  (Also beer, soda, water and ice available for purchase as well)

Best Time to Fish

Summer/Early Morning-Late Afternoon

Fishing is excellent from before sunup to just before mid-morning. At this time of year there is abundant food and cover for fish, so finding hungry fish can be a challenge.

Summer/Late Morning-Early Afternoon

Fishing is poor for most of the day. Fish move to deep water to cool off.

Summer/Afternoon-Early Evening

Fishing is excellent from early sundown until dark as the waters cool and fish rise up from the depths.

Fall/Early Morning

Fish aren’t biting much from sunup to early morning. The water is cool because the sun is too low to penetrate the water.

Fall/Late Morning-Noon

Fish are biting off and on in warmer, shallow water. The water is generally cool due to the season.

Fall/Afternoon-Early Evening

Fishing is excellent. Sun is directly overhead for several hours and the water gets more comfortable near the surface. This makes for seasonally good fishing because fish are putting on weight for the winter. Look for bait schools where bigger fish are more likely to be.